How to Turn down the Anesthesia Job Offer and Still Come Out on Top

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
CRNA Jobs

You wrote the CV, crushed the interview, received the offer and now…you want to turn them down. 

Maybe it wasn’t the right fit. Maybe you had multiple offers. But now you need to let them know, “Thanks, but no thanks.” 

The professionalism you displayed during the interview process needs to carry through in your refusal for the job offer. You never know when your paths might cross again. You might even apply for an anesthesia job with the same group but in a different part of the country. It happens. So don’t burn any bridges!

The good news is jobs are turned down all the time.  You are not breaking any new ground here and employers know it is part of the hiring game. Just like you are not guaranteed a job offer just because you interviewed, you don’t owe them a “yes” because they made the offer.  

It’s all about how you graciously let them know you will not be accepting the wonderful opportunity to work with them. 

The question then becomes do you call or send an email with your response. We recommend calling, but understand that not everyone feels confident with reaching out in person. If you are going to write an email we have some tips below on how to compose a professional response. 

Show Gratitude 

Start your email by showing appreciation. They probably spent a considerable amount of time vetting you before the invitation was sent, organizing the onsite interview and possibly taking care of your interview expenses. 

Maintain a tone of gratitude throughout the email.

  • Thank you very much for the offer to join the anesthesia group. I appreciate the time you and your team spent making me feel welcome and answering all my questions.
  • Thank you very much for the interview last week. The practice is just as I imagined it.  Great people and great leadership. I appreciate the offer to join you.

Give a Reason, But Don’t be Specific

You can’t just say, “I am not taking the job. Peace out.”  Whatever the reason for turning it down, be polite and professional. You don’t want to leave them hanging wondering what went wrong.  But there is a fine line of giving too much information and offending them. Don’t share your thought that they were completely disorganized. 

So keep it simple and concise.

  • After much consideration, I have decided that now is not the right time to leave my current position.
  • After careful consideration, I have decided to accept an offer with another anesthesia group.

For the Anesthesiologist Resident, SRNA and SAA who receives a job offer early in their training

  • After thoughtful consideration, I would like the chance to explore other opportunities this early in my training.

This Isn’t Goodbye

Anesthesia is a small world. Even though the job did not work out it is still a networking opportunity for possibly working together in the future. You want to end with a pleasant note or a reference to something you connected on together during the interview. 

  • I really appreciated the opportunity to get to know you and I hope our paths cross again in the future.
  • Again, thank you very much for everything and I look forward to seeing you at the next anesthesia conference.

Well… Maybe it is Goodbye

And if there was absolutely no way you would ever work with them, try this:

  • Thank you again, and I wish you the best in your future successes.

Putting it all together:

Dear Recruiter,

Thank you very much for the offer to join the anesthesia group. I appreciate the time you and your team spent making me feel welcome and answering all my questions. After much consideration, I have decided that now is not the right time to leave my current position. I really appreciated the opportunity to get to know you and I hope our paths cross again in the future.

Job Seeker

That’s it. Be professional, show gratitude, keep it simple and you will be fine.

Scroll to Top